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These resources support your learning experience.

Resources

To support your learning journey and facilitate your exploration of the dimensions of a highly complex set of topics, explore any/all of these learning options:


Stanford IDEAL DEI Survey Results from fall 2021

Review the results (narrative summary) on the IDEAL DEI Survey website.


Additional Resources

Implicit Association Tests

Harvard has created a series of unique tests, called the Implicit Association Test (IAT). The Implicit Association Test (IAT) measures attitudes and beliefs and may be especially interesting if results show that you have an implicit attitude you didn't know about.

There are many tests to choose from and even if you have taken a test in the past, please take at least two different tests. Each test should take you no more than 15 minutes to complete.

Visit the Harvard Implicit Association Test website.  Review this five-minute video to learn more about the IAT.

When taking the IAT, please note:

  • The test is designed to surface associations that may influence our attitudes and/or behaviors based on our unconscious preferences.
  • Each test is designed to classify, as quickly as possible, words or images that will pop up on the screen into their corresponding category or attribute group.
  • Each IAT can take anywhere between 10-15 minutes to complete, and you will be asked to sort and categorize various images and words as well as engage with a questionnaire related to the topic (race, age, weight, religion, gender, disability, etc.).
  • Please note that taking an IAT is optional.

For more information on IAT and data collection, please review the Harvard IAT frequently asked questions.

Reflecting on the Implicit Association Tests

After you complete each test, we invite you to do more self-reflection. While we may invite you to share any strong reactions during the learning journey, you will not be required to share your personal and private reflections, unless you wish to.

Questions for reflection:

  1. What was your overall reaction to the tests you took? 
  2. What part of the test was challenging? 
  3. What feelings did you have as you were responding to the test?
  4. While taking the test, what insight did you have about your attitudes or stereotyping?
  5. What is resonating for you, and what insights do you have related to your personal and professional life? and if not, why not? 

Guide to Self-reflection when reviewing Resources

As you review the various resources, it can be helpful to reflect on what you are learning. We encourage you to write down your thoughts/reactions/questions. Doing so will help keep the experience alive for you and also help you better prepare for the next step in the IDEAL Learning Journey. While we may invite you to share your reactions during the learning journey, you will not be asked to share your personal and private reflections, unless you wish to.

Download the Guide to Self-reflection to get a document (posted in a Google folder that requires a Stanford login) you can easily add your reflections to and then save to your desktop. Self-reflection questions are included for the videos and articles as well as the Harvard Implicit Association tests.

Download the Guide to Self-reflection

Reflecting on the videos and articles

  1. What were your thoughts while reading and watching? Was there a particular item that caught your attention and or sparked your interest? Which one? In what way?
  2. What were your feelings while reading and watching the resources? (curiosity, sadness, tension, disbelief, guilt, hope, helplessness, inspired to action, intrigued, overwhelmed, else ____)?   What triggered those feelings?
  3. Did you have any physical reactions (sweat, heart racing, agitation)? What did you react to?
  4. What is resonating for you, and what insights do you have related to your personal and professional life? and if not, why not?   
  5. After watching and reading, who did you talk with about the resources, and why or why not?